SHARE
COPY LINK

PUBLIC TRANSPORT

1-2-3 Ticket: Austria’s nationwide rail pass to be further delayed

The wait for the 1-2-3 Ticket - Austria's rail pass which allows for nationwide travel - is set to go on longer, due to resistance from one Austrian state.

1-2-3 Ticket: Austria's nationwide rail pass to be further delayed
A train bridge over the river Kamp in Austria. Photo by Raphael Cruz on Unsplash

The third stage of the “1-2-3 ticket”, or a ticket which would be valid on all public transport in the whole of Austria, is no nearer to completion.

Authorities had hoped to release the ticket at some point in 2021, however a new series of disputes may push back the release date further. 

Broadcaster ORF says the fact that no solution has yet been found is also due to the resistance of the federal state of Burgenland.

The complaint relates to the fact that the ticket would dramatically increase the cost of travelling from Burgenland to Vienna. 

As travelling from Burgenland to Vienna involves crossing Lower Austria, the price of a season ticket from Neudörfl to Vienna, for example, which currently costs 730 euros, would increase to 1,095 euros per year under the new scheme.

The idea behind the 1-2-3 ticket is that Austrian residents can choose to pay one euro per day for unlimited public transport in their own state, two euros per day for travel in two neighbouring states or three euros per day to travel throughout Austria. 

This thereby builds upon the annual 365 Ticket, which gives access to public transport all across Vienna for €365 per year. 

While this may improve the situation for people who travel in their own state or travel regularly to a neighbouring state, those who cross three or more states are set to feel the brunt. 

Politicians in Burgenland are pushing for a compromise, which would keep costs closer to their current level. 

An estimated 25,000 people commute regularly from Burgenland to Vienna, based on pre-pandemic numbers

The Eastern Region Transport Association (Verkehrsverbund Ostregion), which manages transport networks in Burgenland, Lower Austria and Vienna, also wants more money for implementation of the scheme.

Transport Provincial Councilor Heinrich Dorner said the “minister must set up the budgetary resources accordingly”. 

READ MORE: What is the 1-2-3-ticket? Everything you need to know about the new ticket planned to give unlimited public transport across Austria

Member comments

Log in here to leave a comment.
Become a Member to leave a comment.

VIENNA

Why does Vienna’s waste department have a helicopter and a military plane?

Not every waste management department in the world gets a helicopter or military aircraft, but Austria's MA 48 isn't every waste management department. Here's why you may have seen the familiar orange colours on helicopters and military planes.

Why does Vienna's waste department have a helicopter and a military plane?

The Viennese municipal waste department, known as MA48, is undoubtedly a big part of daily life in the Austrian capital – and not only for practical reasons.

Every Viennese will be familiar with the department’s extensive public relations campaigns, from contests for choosing funny one-liners for its trash cans to weekend-long outdoor events showing kids (and grownups) the importance of the proper waste collection and circular economy.

READ ALSO: Hasta la mista, baby? How to vote for your favourite Vienna trash can joke

But some of these public relations expenses might be harder to swipe under the carpet as the City of Vienna Court of Audit shone a light on the high costs of some of these actions, according to the daily newspaper Der Standard.

Most impressively, the audit made by request of opposition party FPÖ showed high expenses, including hiring a military aircraft and a helicopter – quite uncommon for a municipal waste department.

The MA 48 justifies the expenses by saying the aircraft served to attract apprentices and for public relations.

The SPÖ party, which governs Vienna, said that the department achieved “a maximum effect with a minimum budget with its public relations work” and “the advertising measures served to educate citizens and thus protect the environment.”, according to a press release.

READ ALSO: Why Vienna is a haven for wild animals – and where you can find them

The apprentices during one of Ma 48’s events in Vienna (Copyright: Christian Houdek/PID)

Vienna’s audit court partially understands but still recommended some measures to improve transparency. The PR department of MA 48 will set up a cost centre to improve those issues, according to Der Standard.

The City Audit Office Committee will meet for its periodical review of public expenses on May 19th, when the subject should be further debated.

SHOW COMMENTS