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VIENNA

Wiener Weinwandertag: Everything you need to know about Vienna’s ‘Wine Hiking Day’

After a two-year pandemic break, one of Vienna's beloved autumn traditions is back. Here's all the info you need to take part in it.

Wiener Weinwandertag: Everything you need to know about Vienna's 'Wine Hiking Day'
Hiking and wine enjoyment - the traditional Vienna Wine Hiking Day offers a perfect opportunity for a walk in the picturesque Viennese vineyards (PID / Christian Fürthner)

During an early autumn weekend – the exact date varies every year -, thousands of Viennese and people from other parts of Austria participate in the city’s Wine Hiking tradition, which is exactly what it sounds like: walking around vineyards and trying out different wines and food.

It’s a great way to celebrate the arrival of autumn (and fresh wine season) in a very Austrian way: outdoors, with friends and family, and with traditional drinks and food. “Visit wineries and wine taverns with snack stations, taste delicious Viennese wine and enjoy the view of Vienna from viewing points”, the City of Vienna advertises.

READ ALSO: Explore Austria: Mauer, a charming wine-hiking spot on Vienna’s outskirts

There are four different paths that people can take, with different lengths. The shortest is the Ottakring hike, in Vienna’s 16th district, with 2.4 kilometres.

There is also the Mauer trek in the 23rd district, with 4.6 kilometres. The Strebersdorf to Stammersdorf, in the 21st district, offers two different routes, one with an 8.8-kilometre length and the other with a 9.6-kilometre trek.

Finally, the longest trek is in the 19th district, the Neustift am Walde to Nussdorf, with a 10.8-kilometre length. Of course, you don’t need to take the entire route and there are several stops with food, wine, entertainment and even children’s playgrounds on the hikes.

There are also many spots to sit and enjoy the view (and wine). (Copyright: PID / Christian Fürthner)

How do I get to the hiking points?

  • Weinspaziergang Mauer (23rd district): You can get there with the 56A bus (stop Ursulinenkloster) or the Bus 60A (stop Rodauner Strasse).
  • Weinspaziergang Ottakring (16th district): You can get there using bus 56A (Ursuinenkloster stop) or bus 60A (Rodauner Strasse stop). This is a round trek.
  • Weinspaziergang Neustift bis Nussdorf: You can get there through several entering points and follow different routes. The main points are Neustift am Walde (Autobus 35A), Sievering (Autobus 39A), Weingut Wien Cobenzl (Autobus 38A), Grinzing (Straßenbahn 38), Nußdorf (Straßenbahn D).
  • Weinspaziergang Strebersdorf bis Stammersdorf: There are also several points of entrance and different shortcuts to make the trekking shorter, but the main entry points are: Strebersdorf (Straßenbahn 26) and Stammersdorf (Straßenbahn 31).

The hike is family-friendly and can also get quite full (Copyright MA 49 / Fürthner)
 

The hikes in detail

The hikes are varied in length and offers. They bring different resting points and different stalls where local wineries can show their products. The official brochure has all the maps and signs, but the paths themselves are also very well maintained and signalled. The hundreds of people walking them also serve as a good guiding point.

Alternatively, you can also hike along smaller sections. Here you can find maps and more information on each paths:
 
Ottakring

(Stadt Wien)
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau Stippert
B: Weinbau Leitner

Neustift bis Nußdorf

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau Wolf
B: Weingut Kroiss
C: Buschenschank Haslinger
D: Weinbau Burner
E: Weingut Wien Cobenzl / Wiener Gusto
F: Genuss am Cobenzl
G: Buschenschank Hengl-Haselbrunner
H: Weinbau Wiegel
I: Weinbau & Buschenschank Taschler
J: Wagner & Glass
K: Weinbau Langes
L: Mayer am Nußberg
M: Buschenschank Feuerwehr Wagner am Nußberg
N: Weingut Wailand
O: Weingut Stift Klosterneuburg
P: Pedalones
Q: Buschenschank Wanderer am Fuße des Nußbergs
R: Buschenschank Wieninger am Nußberg
S: Buschenschank Franzinger
T: Buschenschank Windischbauer
U: Die Buschenschenkerei Ing. Michael Ruthner
 
Strebersdorf bis Stammersdorf

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weingut Schilling und Tony Allen – Naturalcrafts
B: Weingut Walter Wien
C: WBV Strebersdorf
D: LAWIES – Buschenschank über den langen Wiesthalen
E: Villa Weinrot
F: Bio-Weingut Weinhandwerk
G: WBV Stammersdorf Vinothek
H: Weingut Dr. Höfler – Ausblick.Wien
I: Weingut Sackl
J: Buschenschank in den Gabrissen
K: Keller am Berg K. Lentner
L: Heuriger Gerhard & Hermine Klager
 
Mauer

Stadt Wien
 
Resting spots:
A: Weinbau M&M Beranek
B: Weingut Edelmoser
C: Bio Weingut Fuchs-Steinklammer
D: Buschenschank Grausenburger

READ ALSO: How to drink wine like an Austrian

The trails are senior and child friendly; there are separate, specially marked trails for families who like to travel with prams.

Dogs (on a leash) are welcome.

The stalls are open from 10 am to 6 pm on Saturday and Sunday. In 2022, the event took place on September 24th and 25th.

Member comments

    1. Hi, the exact dates vary every year. In 2022, they were 24-25 September. I did update the article to make that clear, thanks for the heads up.

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Migration Economy: Who are the migrants starting businesses in Austria?

Self-employed migrants - or those building businesses in Austria - contribute hugely to the local economy, a new study has found.

Migration Economy: Who are the migrants starting businesses in Austria?

People born outside of Austria rely, in large part, on self-employment or opening up businesses (and then employing other migrants) as a path to working in the country, a study conducted by the Institute of Advanced Studies (IHS) on behalf of the Integration Fund (OeIF) found.

The study, Migration Economy in Vienna (Migrantische Ökonomien in Wien), also found that some nationalities tend to stick to specific industries – which could be partially explained by how migrants rely on informal networks of people of the same origin to start a business.

READ ALSO: Being self-employed in Austria: What you need to know

For example, people from the former Yugoslavia, Eastern Europe and Turkey often work independently in the construction sector. People from China are strongly concentrated in gastronomy, along with people of Turkish, Syrian, Thai and Maghreb origin.

Migrants originally from Asia and Africa, and especially India, Egypt and Afghanistan, are concentrated mainly in postal and courier services, including bicycle messenger services. Finally, the study found that people from Turkey and former Yugoslavia also appear more often than average registered as taxi drivers.

How much money do they bring in?

Figures from Austria’s Chamber of Commerce (Wirtschaftskammer) showed that business owners in Vienna with a migration background generate € 8.3 billion in revenue and create around 45,500 jobs. 

Plus, these companies pay around € 3.7 billion every year in taxes and duties.

Walter Ruck, President of the Vienna Chamber of Commerce, said: “Companies with a migrant background not only enrich the diversity of the corporate landscape in Vienna, but they are also an economic factor.”

READ MORE: Diversity and jobs: How migrants contribute to Vienna’s economy

Who are these migrants?

Part of the survey involved a qualitative research with migrant entrepreneurs in Vienna, but also a comprehensive quantitative data analysis of registered businesses.

Many of the entrepreneurs interviewed were first generation (meaning they were not born in Austria), and most were between 26 and 35 years old and male. In total, the small businesses surveyed employed two to a maximum of four employees, most of whom were related to the owner.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: The main Austrian ‘tax traps’ foreigners should be aware of

The entrepreneurs with a migrant background who were interviewed generally either did not have higher school-leaving qualifications (known in Austria as the Matura) or have not yet had their foreign certificates recognised in Austria and therefore do not work in their sector of study. 

First-generation migrants, in particular, tend to have lower educational qualifications, which has a negative impact on their chances in the labour market, the study said. Because of that, the respondents named a lack of occupational alternatives as one of the decisive factors for starting a business.

Additionally, many of the respondents said they relied on a network of people from their own nationality for help setting up a business. Many of them weren’t aware of the support offered by official bodies, including the Chamber of Commerce. 

READ ALSO: What is the new cost of living ‘credit’ for self-employed people in Austria?

The study concluded that language barriers and some cultural aspects played a role, but since most entrepreneurs were interested in getting more detailed information on starting and running businesses, there was potential for better communication and targeting by the public offices.

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