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UPDATED: Which countries are now on Austria’s quarantine list?

Austria has imposed a mandatory quarantine on all arrivals from ‘high-risk’ countries. Which countries are on the list?

UPDATED: Which countries are now on Austria’s quarantine list?
A woman walks near the Austrian border. Photo: JOE KLAMAR / AFP

Please note: From May 19th, Austria is expected to change its quarantine rules. Here’s what you need to know. 

Austria has put in place an extensive set of quarantine rules which require arrivals from ‘high-risk’ countries to go into a ten-day isolation. 

On March 9th, several Austrian states extended this to 14 days.

In effect, the quarantine applies to arrivals from almost all countries on earth, with only a few exceptions. 

As at April 21st, 2021, only arrivals from Australia, Iceland, New Zealand, Singapore, South Korea and the Vatican will not be forced to quarantine or to take a test

Please note, as of April 29th, direct flights from India were banned due to concerns about virus mutations

What is Austria’s quarantine? 

After being put in place on December 19th, Austria’s coronavirus quarantine was set to remain in effect until at least January 10th, however a government official told The Local on January 6th that it would remain in force “until further notice”. 

As at April 2021, the government has given no indications the quarantine will be relaxed anytime soon.

In addition, from January 15th, everyone arriving in Austria will need to pre-register.

More information about this can be found at the following link

Who does the quarantine apply to?

The quarantine applies to everyone arriving in the country – i.e. Austrian citizens, residents and non-Austrians. 

Keep in mind that the right to enter Austria is different from the requirement to quarantine. Due to the pandemic, most arrivals from outside Europe have been prevented from entering.  

Click the following link for more information. 

UPDATE: What you need to know about Austria’s quarantine rules

Which countries are classified as ‘high risk’ by the Austrian government? 

‘High risk’ countries are any country which has a 14-day incidence rate of more than 100 positive cases of coronavirus per 100,000 residents. 

As at February 3rd, each of Austria’s neighbours is over this threshold. 

In fact, as it currently stands, only Iceland and the Vatican are not classified as risk countries in Europe. 

As the United Kingdom is now no longer a member of the EU, it is treated as a ‘third country’ and all entry from the UK is therefore banned, other than for Austrian citizens or residents.

Business travellers from the UK and students will also be allowed to enter. 

Up to date information is collated by the European Union and is available here

What about arrivals from countries outside of Europe?

There are a handful of countries from which arrivals will not need to quarantine. 

These are Australia, New Zealand, Singapore and South Korea. Iceland and the Vatican are also on the list. 

Arrivals from these countries will be allowed to avoid quarantine provided they have only stayed in either Austria or the countries mentioned in the past ten days. 

As the United Kingdom is now no longer a member of the EU, it is treated as a ‘third country’ and all entry from the UK is therefore banned, other than for Austrian citizens or residents. Business travellers from the UK and students will also be allowed to enter. 

Uruguay had been on the list, but was removed from January 15th onwards, while Japan was removed on February 3rd. Singapore was added on January 15th. 

An official up to date list of non-European countries can be found here

Are there any exceptions?

There are some limited exceptions to the quarantine rule. 

For instance, commuters will not be required to quarantine – although they will be required to fill out the entry form. 

Quarantine: Here is the form you need to enter Austria 

In addition, people who visit their partners or family in Austria regularly – which is defined by the government as at least once per month – will also be allowed to enter without a quarantine, Kronen Zeitung reports

In addition, there is no quarantine for people who enter the enclaves of Mittelberg (Kleinwalsertal), Vomp-Hinterriss or Jungholz. 

If I am arriving, what do I need to do? 

Austrian authorities are conducting border controls regularly and will inform you of the details of your quarantine requirement. 

Before arriving, you will need to complete a ‘Declaration of Quarantine’ form. This form is available here in English and should be kept on you at all times when entering Austria. 

How was the requirement introduced? 

On December 2nd, Austria announced a change to the country’s quarantine rules – with the centrepiece being a mandatory ten-day quarantine.  

After some initial confusion about the starting date, the Austrian government confirmed that it would apply from December 19th. 

On January 12th, the government announced that there would be changes to the list from January 15th onwards. 

This includes taking Ireland and Uruguay off the list and adding Greece and Singapore. 

Note: This document has been regularly updated to reflect Austria’s changing quarantine rules since December 2020. 

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HEALTH

Reader question: How to get a flu vaccination in Austria?

Austrian doctors and virologists have warned of a particularly strong flu wave this winter and recommend that people get vaccinated. Here's how to get the shot in each province.

Reader question: How to get a flu vaccination in Austria?

Austrian experts have said there would likely be an exceptionally high wave of the flu after hardly any cases were registered in the past two years. The measures against Covid-19 prevented infections with Sars-CoV-2 – and curbed the spread of influenza and other cold viruses.

This is about to change this season as Covid measures were relaxed and airborne viruses spread again, they said.

In principle, the influenza vaccination protects against symptomatic infection for four months: “About 80 percent for H1 viruses, about 50 to 60 percent for H3 strains and 60 to 70 percent for B viruses,” said Monika Redlberger-Fritz, a virologist from Med-Uni Vienna.

READ ALSO: Colds and flu: What to do and say if you get sick in Austria

She added: “But even with vaccine breakthroughs, you are still very well protected against complications, hospitalisations and death.”

Unlike the Covid-19 vaccination, the flu jab is not organised by the federal government but by the respective provinces, which file a report only after the flu season. In every province, the vaccine is free for children, but many ask adults to pay for a fee or get it from their doctors. In Vienna, the flu vaccination is free for everyone.

Here is how to get the vaccine in each province in campaigns carried out with the participation or knowledge of the government – companies and private insurance institutions can also start their own vaccination campaigns.

Vienna

Vienna offers free flu vaccinations for every resident. You can register online with the impfservice.wien or visit one of the centres that accept people without appointments (for example, the Austria Center Vienna). 

All that is necessary is for you to bring a document with your picture and wear an FFP2 mask. If you have an e-card and a vaccination passport, bring those with you as well. There is also a form to fill out, but those are available on-site.  

Lower Austria

The flu vaccine is free for children from six months to 15-years-old, and they can get the shot from established medical specialists. For those who are older, it is possible to receive the vaccination from a registered specialist, company medical service or from their employer, but they may be charged for it.

Residents of elderly and care homes get the vaccination free of charge in the facility where they live.

You can check more about the vaccination with your family doctor and paediatrician.

Upper Austria

Children aged six months to 15 can get the vaccine for free with their general practitioners and paediatricians. However, you may need to get the vaccine components at the pharmacy with a voucher and register with your doctor.

Older people can get the vaccination directly at vaccination sites in their district for €15. Residents of elderly and care homes get the vaccination free of charge in the facility where they live.

Styria

In Styria, children from six months to age 15 get the vaccine for free with paediatricians or public health services of their district authorities.  Older adults can get it from the public health service for €16 or €27 if they are older than 65. 

Residents of elderly and care homes get the vaccination free of charge in the facility where they live.

You can check more about the vaccination with your family doctor and paediatrician.

Carinthia

Children (from six months to 15 years) can get the vaccine for free in doctor’s offices or public health centres. You can check HERE for more information and register. For older people, the price is €22, though prices could be different if you go to your doctor instead of a vaccination centre.

Residents of elderly and care homes get the vaccination free of charge in the facility where they live.

Burgenland

Children aged six months to 15 years can get the vaccine free in pharmacies and with their physicians. At-risk patients older than that can also get free vaccines, but only while supplies last. 

Otherwise, buying and paying for the vaccine in a pharmacy or with your general practitioner is possible. There are also free vaccinations in elderly and care homes. 

You can check more about the vaccination with your family doctor and paediatrician.

Salzburg

Children from six months to 15 years can get the vaccine free with any doctor offering it. You can check with your family doctor or paediatrician. Anyone over 15 that wants to get it needs to buy it at a pharmacy (prices vary depending on the vaccine used) and can ask their family doctor. 

There are free vaccinations for residents of elderly and care homes. 

You can read more about the vaccination offer in Salzburg HERE.

Tyrol

The flu vaccine is free for children from six months to the age of 15 years, and they can get it directly from their doctor (a general practitioner or a paediatrician, for example). For those older, it’s possible to vaccinate with their family doctors, but prices vary for the product and pharmacies and the doctor’s fee. 

Residents of elderly and nursing homes aged 60 and over get the vaccination free of charge.

You can read more about the vaccination offer in Tyrol HERE.

Vorarlberg

In Vorarlberg, children aged six months to 15 years can get the vaccine free with their doctors. Adults can also get it from general practitioner’s offices but will need to pay variable costs (depending on doctor fees and which vaccine they choose).

There are free vaccinations for residents of elderly and care homes. 

You can read more about the vaccination offer in Vorarlberg HERE.

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