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CHRISTMAS

Recipe: Three seasonal twists on classic Bavarian Kipferl cookies

Originally created in Vienna, Kipferl is also the specialty cookie of the Bavarian town, Nördlingen.

Recipe: Three seasonal twists on classic Bavarian Kipferl cookies
Credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz

Vanilla is the classic Kipferl flavor. However, the recipe lends itself to creative variations.

The most time-consuming part of creating these cookies is shaping them. Make it go faster with a Kipferl party. Get your friends or family together for an evening of gemütlichkeit, shaping and baking cookies while drinking Glühwein or hot chocolate.

Matcha Pomegranate Kipferl Recipe

A green tea scented cookie spiked with tart pomegranate flavor. Substitute dried cranberries for the pomegranate seeds.

Prep Time: 20 minutes

Bake Time: 8 Minutes

Yield: 8 Dozen

Credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz

Ingredients:

    •    210g   all-purpose flour

    •    90g     almond flour

    •    60g      powdered sugar

    •    1 T       matcha powder

    •    1/2 t     salt

    •    113g    unsalted butter

    •    90g      dried pomegranate seeds

For the coating:

    •    30g        powdered sugar

Instructions:

    •    Preheat oven to 178 degrees C. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

    •    Whisk together the all-purpose flour, almond flour, powdered sugar, matcha powder, and salt.

    •    In a mixer, cream the butter.

    •    Turn down to low speed and slowly add the dry ingredients.

    •    Add dried pomegranate seeds.

    •    On a lightly floured work surface, use both palms to roll portions of the dough out into a long rope about an index finger thick. Divide the rope into 2+1/2 inch pieces.

    •    Place each piece on a baking sheet, bending the piece into a crescent shape. Pinch the ends.

    •    Bake 8-10 minutes.

    •    Immediately sprinkle with powdered sugar.

    •    Plate and serve.

 

Orange Cardamom Hazelnut Kipferl Recipe

Traditional almond flour is replaced with hazelnut. Ground cardamom and freshly grated orange zest are fragrant additions.

Prep Time: 25 minutes

Bake time: 15 minutes

Chill Time: 30 minutes

Yield: 6 dozen cookies

Credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz

Ingredients:

For the cookies:

    •    1210g      all-purpose flour

    •    200g        hazelnut flour

    •    60g          powdered sugar

    •    1/4 t         baking powder

    •    2 t            ground cardamom

    •    1/2 t         ground cinnamon

    •    2 t            fresh grated orange zest

    •    1/2 t         vanilla extract

    •    1 t            orange extract

    •    200g        cold butter, cut into small pieces

    •    1              egg

For the Coating:

    •    3 T   powdered sugar

    •    1/2 t cardamom powder

    •    2 t    fresh grated orange zest

Directions:

    •    Make the dough:

    •    Whisk together the flour, hazelnut flour, powdered sugar, baking powder, cardamom, and cinnamon

    •    Mix in the orange zest and extracts.

    •    Add butter pieces and knead together. Knead in the egg.

    •    Wrap dough in plastic wrap. Refrigerate 30 minutes.

    •    Preheat oven to 178 degrees C. Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

    •    Place dough on a lightly floured work surface. Use both palms to roll portions of dough into a long rope about an index finger thick.

    •    Divide rope into 2-inch pieces. Place each piece on a baking sheet. Bend to form a crescent shape. Pinch each end  to form a point.

    •    Place in oven and bake for 15 minutes.

    •    Whisk together powdered sugar, cardamom powder, and orange zest.

    •    Remove Kipferl from oven. Roll each in cinnamon powdered sugar mixture. Serve.

Pumpkin Cinnamon Kipferl Recipe

Pumpkin purée adds seasonal flavor to this cinnamon spiked Kipferl.

Prep Time: 30 minutes

Bake Time: 20 minutes

Yield: 4 dozen cookies

Credit: Lora Wiley-Lennartz

Ingredients:

    •    210g  flour

    •    60g    powdered sugar

    •    1/2 t   salt

    •    90g    almond flour

    •    113g  unsalted butter

    •    1 t      vanilla extract.

    •    113g  pumpkin puree

For the Coating:

    •    60g  powdered sugar

    •    1 T  ground cinnamon

Directions:

    •    Preheat oven to 178 degrees C, Line baking sheets with parchment paper.

    •    Whisk together all-purpose flour, powdered sugar, salt, and almond meal.

    •    In a mixer, cream together butter and vanilla.

    •    Add pumpkin puree and combine.

    •    Turn the mixer down to low speed. Slowly add dry ingredients.

    •    Place the dough on a lightly floured work surface. Use both palms to roll portions of the dough out into long ropes about an index finger thick.

    •    Divide each rope into 2-inch pieces. Place each piece on the baking sheet. Bend to form a crescent shape. Pinch ends to form a point.

    •    Bake the cookies for 15 minutes.

    •    Whisk together the powdered sugar and ground cinnamon.

    •    Remove from the oven. Roll each cookie in the cinnamon powdered sugar mixture. Serve.

Lora Wiley-Lennartz is an Emmy nominated television producer and a food/destination blogger who splits her time between Germany and New York City. Read her blog Diary of a Mad Hausfrau or follow her on Facebook for traditional German recipes with a twist.

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WEATHER

Which parts of Austria will have a white Christmas this year?

Even though Austria is known for cold winters, a white Christmas is not as common as you might think. Here are the odds for a snow-filled festive season in Austria this year.

Snow Austria
What are your chances of scenes like this on Christmas Day? Photo: Daniel Diesenreither/Unsplash

A white Christmas is a dream come true for many, but according to weather forecasts the only places in Austria where it can be guaranteed this year are where there is already snow.

This mostly means areas of Carinthia, Vorarlberg and Tyrol where there is already a decent blanket of snow on the ground from Austria’s record snowfall two weeks ago.

In Carinthia, there is currently 20cm of snow in low-lying areas like Feistritz ob Bleiburg, and in Dellach im Drautal there is 40cm of snow.

FOR MEMBERS: Q&A: What will Austria’s Covid restrictions be over Christmas and New Year?

Meanwhile, in Schoppernau in the Bregenzerwald region of Vorarlberg there is almost half a metre of snow cover.

In Tyrol, ski resort towns in the Alps still have a thin covering of snow which is expected to stay throughout the Christmas period, although fresh snow is not forecast until next week.

Additionally, the snow is expected to stay in some parts of the Salzburg region, such as St. Johann in Pongau, Abtenau and Krimml, and in Zeltweg and Mariazell in Styria.

But in many low lying areas of Austria (including Vienna), there is a slim chance of more snowfall, so residents could be in for another “green Christmas” (in reference to green fields at Christmas).

Weather forecast for Christmas 2021

On Friday December 24th, most of the country is forecast for sunshine and clouds. 

Some light rain is expected in Upper Austria in the morning and the temperature will range from a high of 10 degrees in Vienna to 1 degree in East Tyrol. In the Alps, the high is forecast to be around 7 degrees and there could be some freezing rain.

READ MORE: Five Christmas songs to improve your German language skills

On Saturday December 25th, most of the country will have cloud cover with limited sunshine, and some rain is forecast in the east of the country. Snow is expected between 1,500 and 2,000m.

Has Austria’s weather changed?

In recent years, a white Christmas has become increasingly uncommon in Austria due to climate change and warming temperatures, with the chance of a white Christmas almost halved in the past few decades.

According to figures from the Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), St. Pölten in Lower Austria last experienced a white Christmas in 2007.

Linz, Salzburg, Graz, Bregenz and Klagenfurt haven’t had a white Christmas since December 24th in 2010, and Vienna and Eisenstadt have not had snow at Christmas since 2012.

It wasn’t always this way though and in the 1960s most of Austria enjoyed a white Christmas almost every year.

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