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Kickstart your coding career in tech-savvy Berlin

Who says you need to have a programming background to be a part of Berlin’s booming tech startup scene? The Local finds out how one programming bootcamp is helping talent from across the globe make their mark in one of Europe’s top tech hubs.

Kickstart your coding career in tech-savvy Berlin
Photo: Spiced Academy

Berlin is one of Europe’s biggest and most vibrant cities, with a top-class tech scene that’s churning out a new startup every 20 minutes.

But if you don’t have a computer science or engineering degree, it’s easy to feel left out of the action. 

Learn skills that get you hired

As it turns out, learning to code doesn’t have to require years of training.

Instead, you can learn the most in-demand programming languages – and learn them fast – at SPICED Academy’s programming bootcamps in Berlin.

For Brazil-born Guilherme, a civil engineer who always enjoyed fiddling with computers, SPICED Academy’s Full Stack Web Development course delivered almost immediate results.

“After I finished the bootcamp, I started to look for a job. Just one month later, I was hired by Dots Software in Berlin as a software developer,” he explains. “It’s like a shortcut to get a job and learn how to code.”

Click here for more information about SPICED Academy

The intensive course is taught by skilled professionals who have worked with some of the world’s leading tech companies. Learning is accelerated, so after 12 weeks at the bootcamp you’ll be ready to start a creative and challenging career as a software engineer.

Also — if you are already registered as unemployed in Germany you may be able to attend SPICED Academy’s Full-Stack Web Development course for free. Learn more by clicking here.

Learn to think like a programmer

You’ll get to grips with the most popular scripting language, JavaScript, which is used by all major web browsers, as well as in-demand programming languages including HTML & CSS, MVC Frameworks and Node.js.

Equally important is SPICED Academy’s focus on helping students develop critical thinking, computational, and problem-solving skills.

By building real-world, production-ready web applications throughout the 12 week programme, students graduate with a portfolio of applications as well as hands-on experience applying the critical thinking skills they’ll need to excel in their careers and in life.

With your new skills you’ll be a strong candidate for a tech job in Berlin, or with companies in other cities where coding skills are in high demand.

Dedicated teachers

Working in groups and individually, you’ll tackle real-world problems that prepare you for the reality of your new career.

“The biggest challenge for me was the change of mind set,” says SPICED alum Rafael, an architect who realized he needed coding skills to “make my ideas come to life”.

Now at Pivii Technologies, a Berlin-based startup that makes images measurable, he credits SPICED instructors with helping him better understand how the internet and algorithms work.

“Some particular projects were challenging, but the team was always very helpful and very friendly, and I never went home with a question unanswered,” he adds.

Great instructors at SPICED also helped Mike transition away from an unsatisfying career as a banker into a engineering role at audio streaming platform SoundCloud.

“The dedicated teachers and staff were always available and willing to assist with any issues, be they related to coding or even just settling in,” he explains.

Lean more about SPICED Academy coding bootcamps in Berlin

But the guidance doesn’t stop with your new tech skills and helping you to feel at-home in the city.

Throughout the course, you’ll get advice on your profile, interview, and communication skills, as well as access to SPICED’s business network that’s always looking for new talent. So by the time you’re ready to apply for jobs, you’ll be fully prepped for the recruitment process.

Why study in Berlin?

Having worked in marketing and business development, recent SPICED graduate Karen arrived in Berlin after growing tired of watching software developer colleagues come up with ideas and make them a reality while she simply “sat on the sidelines”.

“It’s a really great programme to go to especially for Americans looking to do a bootcamp abroad; you don’t even have to worry about getting a visa to be here,” says Karen, who now works as a Product Owner and Developer at geeny.io.

“Being from the States, I couldn’t really afford another four years in school and out of the job industry.”

The SPICED programme is intense, but when you're not busy coding you can spend time soaking up the city’s history and culture in the wide assortment of bars, restaurants, cafes, and shops you’ll find on Berlin’s atmospheric streets. Berlin is packed full of must-see museums, world-class galleries, and some of the best attractions anywhere.

It's also cheaper to live in Berlin compared to many other big cities across the globe.

“Berlin is a fantastic location,” adds Karen. “You can actually afford to enjoy your Friday night.”

Think you’re ready to kickstart your coding career in Berlin?

Visit SPICED Academy for more information about upcoming courses and application deadlines.

This article was produced by The Local's Client Studio and sponsored by SPICED Academy.

 

COMEDY

Poking fun at our foibles through stand-up

Patrick Lamb was born and grew up in Sheffield in the UK and now lives in Vienna where he works as a stand-up comedian. He spoke to The Local about life as an English language comic in the Austrian capital.

Poking fun at our foibles through stand-up
Patrick Lamb. Photo: Stefan Nützel

What brought you to Vienna?

I came to Vienna in 1999. My older brother had done a year of his language degree here, fallen in love with the place and returned after graduation. I had then just completed my studies as an illustrator in the USA and returned to Sheffield, uncertain of my next steps. When he called and suggested I come out to join him, I assented.

To begin with, Vienna seemed very much like paradise. It was June, everybody was outside, laughing – in Vienna's lighter, summer mode. I was very impressed by all the architecture, culture and by how jovial and relaxed everybody seemed. This turned to shock that October, when the population donned funereal black and switched into their determinedly miserable, winter mode. This is much less extreme now, but back then it was almost ubiquitous.

How well did you adapt to life in your new home?

To begin with I found the Austrian mentality very difficult to deal with, very exhausting. This was partly because I had spent the preceding three years just outside New York, where the people have a dynamism that is the polar opposite to Viennese 'Gemütlichkeit'. Everything is possible and the mentality is one of “Yes, you can do it!” rather than a grumpy “das wird eh nicht gehen…”

I was also, I admit, a very bad fit back then. I wanted everything and I wanted it yesterday. Now I am much happier living here. I have adapted to life here to some extent and have met people who have been kind enough to open doors for me or help me to see some for myself.

 

How would you describe the Viennese sense of humour?

The Viennese sense of humour shares certain similarities with the English sense of humour, though it seems to me several shades darker and less obviously self-deprecating. I am in the process of getting to know the local comedy and Kabarett scene better, though much of it is very culture-specific and therefore inaccessible to people who haven't grown up here, steeped in Austrian and Central European culture and history.

I grew up watching classics of British comedy like Blackadder, Fawlty Towers, the Python films, A Bit of Fry and Laurie etc., all of which influenced my own sense of humour and outlook on life. I don't really see any direct link between other comedians and what I do, really. For me they are very much on some separate, more rarefied level. I am happy telling my stories and laughing with people about our universal foibles.

What’s your idea of a good night out?

One of the things I love most of all is spending an evening with a group of friends in the pub, laughing and sharing good jokes with one another. Something magical happens. The outside world recedes for a few hours, left outside the door. The world's problems and one's own problems are forgotten for a short time. A group of people bond through shared laughter. It is an illusion, but one absolutely necessary for our survival, I think.

My decision to work as a comedian is an outgrowth of that. I love laughing with people, sharing that wonderful silliness, poking fun at our foibles and thus, I hope, making them more bearable.

There are successful comedians who are much harsher than I aspire to be, excoriating hecklers and crucifying 'the great and the good'. The best of them are necessary, because many of our public figures so deserve the crucifixion of public ridicule and these comedians execute their task with great skill and accuracy. I'm not sure I would be able to do that, even if I wanted to. I doubt I have the malice.

See Patrick's English language stand-up show WTF? on February 26th at Kabarett Vindobona, Wallensteinplatz 6, 1200 Vienna. It covers relationships, gender differences, dating, sex, the EU, languages and national stereotypes, the Vikings and furniture.

To find out more go to: www.patricklamb-comedy.com