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Online auctions 2017: design trends and insights from Barnebys

How has global demand for the most sought-after designers changed in last decade? A new report from leading art and auction search engine Barnebys reveals some surprising trends.

Online auctions 2017: design trends and insights from Barnebys
Barnebys

The report, ‘Barnebys 2017 Online Auction Report: 15 Designated Designers – Trends and Insights’, focuses on the development of the global market for fifteen of the most sought-after names in contemporary design.

Among other things, the report reveals astonishing growth in demand for 20th century design, with the market for design increasing by almost 330 percent between 2009 and 2016.

“Today, anyone can get their hands on iconic design furniture for a very modest price, while international collectors continue to pay millions for furniture and design objects of the highest quality,” says Pontus Silfverstolpe, co-founder of Barnebys, the leading online search service for arts, antiques and rarities.

The report’s findings are based on an analysis of more than 31 million realised auction prices from 315 auction houses in 29 countries. It focuses on works by 15 ‘designated designers’ from Denmark, France, Finland, Sweden, and the United States and estimates their total market value in 2016 at €38.3 million.

The growth is due in large part to the increased transparency and access that comes with online auctions, which provide more opportunities for more people to buy iconic design furniture.

''Barnebys has opened the auction industry to the masses, making a world of unique, quality items available to everyone,” adds Silfverstolpe.

According to the report, collectors are paying considerable attention to design, with prices on a limited supply of unique, high-end design pieces getting boosted to fine-art market status in some cases.

And while established designers may drop in price, collectors continue to hunt for the next trendy designer in hopes of finding a diamond in the rough that could pay big dividends later on.

“Buying design is a better investment than, say, buying art, no matter what the price range,” says Barnebys co-founder and CEO Christopher Barnekow. “Achieving a more personal, beautiful interior is a bonus.”

Find your own design treasure with Barnebys

This article was produced by The Local Client Studio and sponsored by Barnebys.

ART

London Tube gets covered-up versions of Schiele nudes after it deems the originals too racy

As the art world plans to celebrate the centenary of Austrian expressionist painter Egon Schiele's death, some of his nudes have been dubbed too racy to show in their full glory, not least in the London underground.

London Tube gets covered-up versions of Schiele nudes after it deems the originals too racy
Photo: Christian Lendl/Vienna Tourist Board/AFP
Austrian museums will next year host a series of exhibitions and events to mark the centenary of his passing but time has apparently not dimmed some of the prudish attitudes prevalent in his lifetime regarding his rawest works, Vienna Tourist Board director Norbert Kettner told AFP.
   
Two of his works — “Seated Male Nude (Self-Portrait),” from 1910, and his 1914 work “Girl With Orange Stockings,” appear with their genitals covered over after Transport for London found the uncensored originals beyond the pale.
 
Advertising hoardings in Germany have similarly covered the offending parts, even though the works were deliberately selected as “we wanted to raise a discussion and the theme of nudity seemed pertinent,” Kettner told AFP.
 
“The campaign was ready but when we came up with the first visuals we had several reactions of 'that won't do; regulations won't allow us to show genitalia,'” he explained after the London Tube and a German airport both complained.
 
“We had the green light for a very large format and, the day before they went up, agreement was withdrawn as an ethics committee felt (full nude versions) wouldn't be acceptable for an airport public” or patrons of London's underground trains.
 
The Viennese tourist office quickly revamped the pictures, covering up the offending organs and adding on the blotted out section the slogan, “SORRY, 100 years old but still too daring today.”
 
They have also added the hashtag #ToArtItsFreedom in London – a play on the “To every age its art. To every art its freedom” inscribed on the entrance of the Vienna Secession building housing the union of Austrian artists movement.
 
Kettner revealed that a Viennese display did not share the artistic-sexual qualms of the British or the Germans and had approved a “non-censored” version.
 
The prolific Schiele, born in 1890 and who died of Spanish flu aged 28, was not always popular in his homeland where some, notably in conservative circles, took a dim view of his vision of tortured eroticism.
 
Nonetheless, a retrospective of his work will see a number of exhibitions highlight his talents as well as those of his first mentor and Secession co-founder Gustav Klimt.