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Austria gets through 50 million eggs at Easter

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Austria gets through 50 million eggs at Easter
Photo: Jerry Barton
11:38 CET+01:00
Businesses in Vienna expect to rake in €60 million over the Easter period as confectionery and other festive products fly off the shelves.

The season is big business for egg producers with around 50 million eggs being bought by Austrians over Easter, many of which will be painted and used as decoration. That equates to roughly six eggs per person in Austria.

Ten million coloured Easter eggs will be bought this week in Vienna alone, as well as countless high range products such as salmon and sparkling wine in preparation for Easter Sunday breakfast.

Hotels are also expected to benefit as last year there were over 1.2 million overnight stays in Vienna during the Easter month, with tourists attracted to the city's seasonal markets.

In Salzburg people are expected to spend a total of €16 million this year over the Easter period, which is a 17 percent increase than ten years ago according to the chamber of commerce.

Watchdog warns of chocolate bunny health risk

Chocolate gifts given to children are also a mainstay of the season but recently published research suggests some products might be putting people at risk.

Laboratory analysis of twenty chocolate rabbits carried out by consumer organisation foodwatch found that eight of them included potentially cancerous aromatic mineral oils.

The oils were found in both cheaper products from stores such as Penny and Aldi but also in higher range chocolate rabbits from brands such as Lindt or Feodora.

Foodwatch are demanding the confectionery industry does more to prevent the oils from getting into the products.

A spokesperson for the confectionery industry has reassured consumers, however, that all products are controlled under current regulations.

“The chocolate Easter rabbits are currently tested under stringent food laws. They can be eaten safely,” said Klaus Reingen, head of the national association of the German confectionery industry.


 

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