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SEX

School magazine linked to porn quiz

The publishers of a student magazine that was distributed to children as young as ten in Baden are in trouble after it was found to feature provocative images of half-naked girls and a link to an Internet quiz containing pornographic content.

School magazine linked to porn quiz
The cover of the magazine.

The latest edition of student magazine Lei(n)wand features a cover story exploring the fine line between advertising and pornography – but angry parents and teachers said it went too far.

A QR code in the magazine linked to an online quiz which showed pornographic images unsuitable for those aged under 18. 

The free magazine is edited by Konstantin Kladivko, a student at Baden high school and a member of the social democrats affiliated student group Aktion Kritischer Schüler.

2,500 issues of the magazine were distributed to four high schools in Baden. Kladivko said the magazine was given to all age groups as he felt it was an issue that affected everyone, but that the team realised too late that the quiz they had linked to contained inappropriate images.

The headmaster of Baden’s HLA school, Thomas Douschan, said he was appalled. "This student newspaper has not been authorized by the schools, as has been suggested," he told the Kurier newspaper. 

He added that he had received several complaints, both from parents and students, and that the Lower Austrian school board was now dealing with the issue.

Regional School Board president Hermann Helm said the magazine “is a private project that is the responsibility of the publisher,” and that Kladivko may end up facing charges.

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EDUCATION

Austrian MPs give green light to headscarf ban in primary schools

Austrian MPs on Wednesday approved a law aimed at banning the headscarf in primary schools, a measure proposed by the ruling right-wing government.

Austrian MPs give green light to headscarf ban in primary schools
Illustration Photo: AFP

So as to avoid charges that the law discriminates against Muslims, the text refers to any “ideologically or religiously influenced clothing which is associated with the covering of the head”.

However, representatives of both parts of the governing coalition, the centre-right People's Party (OeVP) and the far-right Freedom Party (FPOe), have made it clear that the law is targeted at the Islamic headscarf.

FPOe education spokesman Wendelin Moelzer said the law was “a signal against political Islam” while OeVP MP Rudolf Taschner said the measure was necessary to free girls from “subjugation”.

The government says the patka head covering worn by Sikh boys or the Jewish kippa would not be affected.

Austria's official Muslim community organisation IGGOe has previously condemned the proposals as “shameless” and a “diversionary tactic”.

The IGGOe says that in any case only a “miniscule number” of girls would be affected.

Opposition MPs almost all voted against the measure, with some accusing the government of focusing on garnering positive headlines rather than child welfare.

The government admits that the law is likely to be challenged at Austria's constitutional court, either on grounds of religious discrimination or because similar legislation affecting schools is normally passed with a two-thirds majority of MPs.

The OeVP and FPOe formed a coalition in late 2017 after elections in which both parties took a tough anti-immigration stance and warned of the dangers of so-called “parallel societies”.

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