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IMMIGRATION

Migrants in Vienna stuck in low-paid work

Almost half the population of Vienna - 49 percent - has an immigrant background and suffers discrimination in the work market according to Vienna’s Integration and Diversity Monitoring group.

Migrants in Vienna stuck in low-paid work
Photo: APA/dpa

Despite having qualifications, many people with a migration background are often stuck in low-paid jobs.

Integration Councillor Sandra Frauenberger (SPÖ) said that 31 percent of people with a migration background are first generation immigrants, and 18 percent are second generation. 23 percent of Viennese residents have a foreign passport.

According to the latest findings from the monitoring group more than half of those immigrants who have lived in Vienna since the mid-1990s have finished secondary school. But despite their qualifications they have trouble finding decent jobs – especially those who originally come from non-EU countries. A third of those with good Matura grades only find work in semi-skilled, low-paid jobs.

The net income of households with no migration background has increased by ten percent in the last ten years – to an average of €23,000 a year. However, in households with a migration background the average household income remains at €15,000.

Frauenberger said that the city council wants migrant's existing skills and qualifications to have more recognition.

She also said that it was a problem that 24 percent of Vienna’s voting age population are excluded from casting their ballot because they don’t have Austrian citizenship. A change to the voting law can only be made at federal level.

The number of people taking Austrian citizenship this year is up 6.4 percent on last year, according to the latest figures from Statistik Austria.

5,671 people took Austrian citizenship in the first nine months of this year, the majority were from Bosnia and Herzegovina (14.8 percent), followed by Turkey (12 percent), and Serbia (9 percent).

More than a third of new citizens were born in Austria. Birth in Austria does not in itself confer Austrian citizenship, but it may lead to a reduction in the residence requirement for naturalisation.

In July, the far-right Austrian Freedom Party leader Heinz-Christian Strache called for immigrants who don't learn the German language to be expelled.

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IMMIGRATION

MAP: Who are the foreigners in Austria?

Austria's recent Migration & Integration report paints a detailed picture of who are the immigrants in the country, where they come from, the languages they speak at home and more.

MAP: Who are the foreigners in Austria?

More than a quarter of Austria’s population has a “migration background”, which, according to the statistics institute Statistik Austria, means that they have parents who both were born abroad, regardless of their own nationality or place of birth.

Though migration is a controversial topic for some, Statistik Austria made it clear that if not for it, the country would simply stop growing.

“Austria’s population is growing solely due to immigration. Without it, according to the population forecast, the number of inhabitants would fall back to the level of the 1950s in the long term”, says Statistik Austria’s director general Tobias Thomas.

READ ALSO: IN NUMBERS: One in four Austrian residents now of foreign origin

Who are the foreigners in Austria?

Not every person with a migration background is considered a foreigner, though. Many of them have parents who were born abroad but naturalised Austrians before having children, or they themselves became Austrian citizens later on.

This is why despite 25.4 percent of the population having a “migration background”, the number of people with foreign nationalities is slightly lower at 17.7 percent.

So, who are these people? 

German is still the most common nationality among foreigners in Austria (218,347 people). But much had changed since 2015 (when there were 170,475 Germans).

The number of Romanians has almost doubled (from 73,374 to 140,454), bringing them to the second-largest foreigner community in Austria, behind German citizens.

In 2015, Turkish was the second-largest foreign nationality in Austria (there were 115,433), but they are now the fourth (with 117,944 people), behind German, Romanian, and Serbians (121,643).

They are helping Austria get younger

In Austria, most people without a migration background (36.2 percent) are between 40 to 64 years old. The share is also quite large among those with 65 or more years, reaching 21.8 percent.

When it comes to people with a migration background, most are between 40 to 64 years old (34.4 percent), followed closely by the 20 to 39-year-olds (33.5 percent), and then the children and adolescents until 19 years of age (22 percent). Only 10.2 percent of the people with a migration background are older than 65.

READ ALSO: EXPLAINED: How does the Austrian pension system work?

Regarding nationalities, Austrians have an average age of 44.8, followed by Germans, who average 41.1. The youngest populations are the Afghani living in Austria (24.9 years old on average) and the Syrians (26.3).

Immigration helps keep the Austrian population younger. (Photo by Huy Phan on Unsplash)

Language and education

People with a migration background living in Austria have a different educational profile than the population without a migration background, according to the Statistik Austria data.

They are more often represented in the lowest and highest educational segments and less often in the middle-skilled segment than the population without a migration background.

However, the educational level of immigrants is improving over time, on the one hand, due to increasing internal migration, also of higher educated people within the EU. On the other hand, as a result of the selective immigration policy toward third-country nationals by the Red-White-Red Card, the institution said.

READ ALSO: How Austria is making it easier for non-EU workers to get residence permits

In 2021, 19.4 percent of the Austrian population had higher education, such as a university degree, and 10.9 percent had only mandatory primary schooling. Regarding foreigners, 29 percent had university-level education and 25.1 percent had completed only their primary school years.

When it comes to children and the language they speak, German was the first language of about 72 percent of the four and 5-year-old children in elementary educational institutions in Austria.

READ ALSO: Austria ranked world’s ‘second least friendly country’

With just under six percent each, Turkish and Bosnian-Croatian-Serbian (BKS) were the most common non-German first languages. Around two percent each spoke Romanian, Arabic or Albanian, followed by Hungarian (one percent).

Less than one percent each for Persian, Polish, Slovakian, English, Russian and Kurdish, respectively, as the first languages. Languages other than those mentioned were spoken by slightly more than five percent.

And who is naturalising Austrian?

Not all foreigners become Austrian, even if they have been in the country for decades. One of the reasons is that the process is expensive, but also because it requires applicants to give up their previous citizenship – something many are unwilling to do.

READ ALSO: Could Austria change the rules around citizenship?

According to the report, in 2021, most foreign citizens who naturalised Austrian were from Turkey originally (1,100), followed by Bosnia (921), Serbia (782), Afghanistan (545), and Syria (543).

More than one-third of the people naturalising Austrian last year were already born in Austria, and most of the naturalisations were of young people between 20 and 40 years old.

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